Full Body Movements Can Relax Painful Muscles

The body moves as one intelligent, whole system. When muscle pain occurs, the system itself simply needs improvement.

Most people find Hanna Somatics (also known as Clinical Somatics) because they have an issue that their doctors, physical therapists, chiropractors, massage therapists, and energy healers can't seem to fully address. A muscle, or a part of the body hurts (that is not related to a pathology), and most practitioners focus on that one area in order to try and "fix" it.

Eliminating muscle pain is an educational process.

Hanna Somatic Educators teach people to remember how to move the way they once did. That, simply put, is an educational process. Rather than focusing on one specific area of pain or one muscle group that needs to learn to relax and release, we address full body movement patterns. This, I've found, is a missing link for everyone who walks through my office door. The body should move as an integrated whole, beautifully coordinated – not as a series of separate parts.

Sometimes our clients teach us as much as we teach them. Last week I worked with "Sharon," an older client with scoliosis, stenosis, and sciatica. She realized that her muscles are stuck in a pattern of non-movement and that retraining her brain (the command center of the muscles) to remember how to move her muscles is reversing her pain. Now she not only walks longer distances without pain, but her tilted posture has improved so that standing "straight" is less of a strain.

Break bad movement habits out of gravity and new movement is easier to integrate while in gravity.

However, she's uncomfortable working on my table. Hanna Somatic Educators normally work with a client on the table first, because the brain will re-engage old patterns of muscular holding while in gravity. But with Sharon we threw out the rule book and did something new. I got her on her feet and said, "let's move."

She stood slightly away from the wall and "reached up to the top shelf" to begin to re-pattern the movement of the hips - one hip up, the other down, as the waist lengthened on one side and shortened on the other side. We played a few slowly paced Exuberant Animal resistance games of reaching across to your partner's hands (like "Patty Cake"), to lengthen the trunk rotator muscles on one side.

Sharon's AHA! moment came when I reminded her to allow her hips, legs and knees to move along with the movement. She'd forgotten that the whole body moves as one. She was like a child learning a new dance step. What fun! Between each movement game she walked up and down the hallway to integrate the new awareness she had created. No pain at all. She was overjoyed.

Here's a short video of some similar movements to what I did with Sharon. It's from a recent Exuberant Animal weekend. Enjoy!

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