Relieve Your Arm, Hand and Wrist Pain Using Somatic Movement

In my last post I shared an email from a client who had severe arm, hand, and wrist pain. Rather than stretching those muscles or attempting to relax them through trigger point therapy or passive release, check out the video below and find out how they can work for you. [wpvideo qNdjbWg2]

Tight, frozen muscles learn to stay tight through repetitive actions that involve the muscles of the forearms, hands and fingers. This creates an involuntary pattern of contraction. The most effective, long-term solution is through pandiculation of the muscles: contracting them first, followed by a slow lengthening, and a complete relaxation. This reeducates the muscles to release.

It's also important to address the muscles of the center of the body that contribute to tight forearms. Remember that the body works as a whole cooperative system, not as a separate series of interchangeable parts. Pay attention to the way in which you sit when you're at the computer or driving. Slumping to one side, or tightening one shoulder is a pattern that can contribute to arm, hand, and wrist pain. Relax the big muscles in the center of the body, and the periphery (the arms, hands, legs and feet) will more easily relax.