Why Am I Limping, and Is It Cause For Concern?

Many clients have posture that is "out of balance"; their hips and pelvis are not level, their leg length is uneven, their gait is not smooth. Some clients have said, "Just the other day someone asked me why I was limping, and I never even noticed I limped... all I know is that my back is killing me!" They're not concerned about their limp, because their limp feels "normal." This feeling of "out of balance" feeling "balanced" is an example of Sensory Motor Amnesia, in which the brain literally forgets how to sense, move and control muscles efficiently. We compensate, habituate and adapt to what happens to us in life (accidents/injuries are common) so our muscles no longer move freely the way they once did. When you lose awareness of the way in which you move - something that only you can experience - there is cause for concern.

Most of my clients with back, hip or piriformis pain often accompanied by a limp were treated unsuccessfully by physical therapy, bodywork of all kinds, drugs, and cortisone shots. What was missing in their treatment was the simple understanding of how a limp develops as a compensatory, full body pattern, which muscles are involved in the need to limp, and how to reverse the pattern and move freely again. Back, hip joint, knee pain, sciatica and piriformis syndrome pain are common conditions easily reversed with Hanna Somatics.

Limping means the center of your body is out of balance.

When we walk we are meant to walk with a smooth, even gait. Our pelvis is perfectly designed for upright, bipedal locomotion. The more we allow the pelvis to move as we walk, the more efficient and effortless our movement will be and the less joint stress and pain we will have. Below is a great video of balanced, strong walking and upright posture - a necessity for African women carrying items on their heads.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=cThEt5KmdV4&NR=1]

This kind of natural movement is "the norm" until something occurs to change that.

When we have an accident - a slip on the ice, a fall on our coccyx, or a bone break - the involuntary part of our brain immediately contracts certain muscles of the trunk to protect that area. This is called the Trauma Reflex. We learn to compensate until the injury is healed. The latissimus, obliques, adductors, abductors and abdominal muscles all contract instantly, in a pattern, as we twist and rotate in an attempt to regain our balance or protect our injured limb - as in the photo at right.

This kind of functional problem of one side of the waist and trunk tighter than the other can, over time, create true structural damage, like hip joint pain, labral tears, osteoarthritis, and hip joint impingement.

The Trauma Reflex causes us to limp, putting more weight into one side of the body.

When you get stuck in this particular stress reflex, pain isn't far behind. You begin to walk like a car with one flat tire, galumphing from side to side. The easiest way to reverse a limp is to get the brain back in control of the muscles. Those who have had an accident or injury would be wise to seek the clinical help of a skilled guidance of a Certified Hanna (Clinical) Somatic Educator for a series of clinical sessions in order to restore full muscle function and movement.

Somatic Exercises for limping

For those who own my Pain Relief Through Movement DVD, the following exercises focus on the waist muscles/trunk rotators, and are excellent for helping to restore a free and balanced gait:

  • Side bend - releases and lengthens the waist muscles for equal movement of the pelvis.
  • Washrag - brings in gentle twisting of the pelvis, and shoulders, as the waist lengthens
  • Human X* - the quintessential movement of "crawling," which lengthens both sides of the body
  • Steeple twist* - increases the ability to twist and lengthen the center of the body - back, abdominals, waist
  • Walking exercises, part 1 & 2* - freeing the pelvis and reintegrating a healthy pattern of walking.
  • Hip lift and reach - from my Pain-Free Leg and Hip Joints DVD

* found on the Pain Relief Through Movement DVD